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PRO PLAYERS REALTY USA presents Tallahassee Commercial Property for sale over $500,000

PRO PLAYERS REALTY USA presents a list of Tallahassee Commercial Property for sale over $500,000 offered by your Tallahassee Real estate team. Call us for help 850.942.SOLD {7653}

 

Address City Zip Price
1845 Jaclif Court TALLAHASSEE 32308 $500,000
2823 Capital Circle Northeast TALLAHASSEE 32308 $500,000
125 N Gadsden Street TALLAHASSEE 32301 $500,000
2011 S Adams Street TALLAHASSEE 32301 $550,000
310 Polk Drive TALLAHASSEE 32301 $550,000
5 SHADEVILLE HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $550,000
4390 Crawfordville Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $575,000
430 SE Mill Street OTHER FLORIDA 32066 $595,000
2437 SW CR 360 MADISON 32340 $595,000
483 PORT LEON DRIVE ST MARKS 32355 $599,000
XXXX Pat Thomas QUINCY 32351 $650,000
0 HWY 365/98 CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $650,000
3771 Crawfordville Hwy CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $663,000
308 E Orange Avenue TALLAHASSEE 32303 $675,000
716 Monroe Street North TALLAHASSEE 32303 $675,000
703 Railroad Avenue TALLAHASSEE 32303 $680,000
3856 S SR 53 MADISON COUNTY 32340-5938 $699,000
1845 Jaclif Court TALLAHASSEE 32308 $750,000
xx Coastal Hwy 98 CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $750,000
1721 Crawfordville Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $752,750
3651 Hartsfield Road TALLAHASSEE 32303 $776,400
2930 COASTAL HWY MEDART 32327 $795,000
5 Franklin Ct. TALLAHASSEE 32311 $799,000
2627 Spring Creek Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 $799,000
1951 W Jefferson Street QUINCY 32351 $800,000
1815 S ADAMS ST TALLAHASSEE 32301 $824,900
1131 Live Oak Street QUINCY 32351 $890,000
1246 Timberlane Road TALLAHASSEE 32312 $899,000
3058 Highland Oaks Terrace TALLAHASSEE 32311 $900,000
306 N Monroe Street TALLAHASSEE 32301 $950,000
21239 Keaton Beach Drive KEATON BEACH 32348 $950,000
2001 Thomasville Road TALLAHASSEE 32308 $980,000
2414 E Plaza Drive TALLAHASSEE 32308 $987,900
1140 W Tharpe Street TALLAHASSEE 32303 $997,000
2377 Lake Hall Road TALLAHASSEE 32309 $999,000
1202 PARK AVE E TALLAHASSEE 32301 ########
3373 Garber Drive TALLAHASSEE 32303 ########
222 E COLLEGE Avenue TALLAHASSEE 32301 ########
228 Gaile Ave TALLAHASSEE 32305-5201 ########
xx Coastal Hwy 98 CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
xx Crawfordville Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
3339 HIGHWAY 98 CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
1123 Thomasville Road TALLAHASSEE 32303 ########
9495 Puckett Road PERRY 32348 ########
xx Coastal Hwy 98 CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
3209 E Mahan Drive TALLAHASSEE 32308 ########
2412 W Tennessee Street TALLAHASSEE 32304 ########
xx Crawfordville Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
xx Crawfordville Highway CRAWFORDVILLE 32327 ########
1531 Commonwealth Business Drive TALLAHASSEE 32303 ########
00 Harbour Drive SHELL POINT 32327 ########
9330 W Tennessee Street TALLAHASSEE 32311 ########

7680 Tally Ann Dr Great Tallahassee Starter Home for Sale

Relocation! Bring Offer Soon! Most of the expensive items have been recently replaced. Including roof, HVAC, Windows, exterior Doors and drain field. This house has good potential. On a pond, privacy fenced large backyard with extra large deck. Pond is supposed to be redone by Leon County very soon. Call for showing!

Join us on  https://www.facebook.com/ProPlayersRealty

John Stehmeyer
Realtor® Broker CEO
https://i1.wp.com/i.imgur.com/TwjH0.png?w=783
PRO PLAYERS REALTY USA
Office (850) 942-SOLD (7653)

3501 Martin Hurst Rd, Tallahassee FL 32312

If you know someone who needs Real Estate Help please introduce me to them!

 

 

Seniors Real Estate Specialist Newsletter – Helping Seniors Live Better!

 

 

Consumer Newsletter – July 2012 www.sres.org


Seniors Real Estate Specialist Newsletter – Helping Seniors Live Better!

 

By Elyse Umlauf-Garneau

Fend Off Loneliness

Caretakers of elderly parents and relatives often feel relieved once they’ve resolved the housing  and aging-in-place challenges. But a key missing piece of that care puzzle could be the seniors’ social and mental well-being.

Study results released in June 2012 by the University of California San Francisco (www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/06/12184/loneliness-linked-serious-health-problems-and-death-among-elderly) show a direct correlation between loneliness and poor health among the elderly.

It found that loneliness can affect a person’s ability to perform daily activities, such as upper extremity tasks, climbing stairs, and walking. Moreover, people who identified themselves as lonely had a 59 percent greater risk of decline and a 45 percent greater risk of death.

If you suspect that your loved ones are lonely, getting them out and involved could help them fend off boredom, isolation, and loneliness.

Here are eight ideas:

 

 

 

1. Art as therapy. Try an art class, but one that isn’t strictly for seniors. Your loved ones will meet people of all ages, broaden their social horizon, and learn a new skill.  And just because someone can’t draw doesn’t mean they can’t be a successful artist. Other media include pottery, printmaking, and fiber arts.

2. Computer literacy. Widen your parents’ and elderly relatives’ world by teaching them how to use a computer, and introduce them to Facebook, blogging and Twitter.

A Pew Research report (www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Older-adults-and-internet-use/Main-Report/Internet-adoption.aspx) found that seniors really take to the online life. For many, using the internet and e-mail has become a daily habit.

Before they make their online debut, be sure that seniors know the risks and what precautions to take to protect their accounts and their privacy.

Provide some basics on searching for sites specific to their interests. There’s www.anobii.com for bookworms, www.ravelry.com for knitters, and www.care2.com for eco-minded people.

3. Meet-ups. The site, www.Meetup.com, lets people interested in a given topic or activity find one another online then organize in-person  get-togethers.  You can find book clubs, art outings, and political activism events, as well as people who are interested in discussing Shakespeare and practicing ballroom dancing.

4. Man’s best friend. There’s  a reason that dogs are called man’s best friend. They bring joy and laughter, they’re affectionate, and they provide companionship. In addition,  daily walks with dogs force seniors to get all-important exercise and help them connect with other dog owners.

Just take a look at local parks during dog-walking hours. You see dogs romping and pet owners schmoozing. A dog could be the gateway to better health and stronger social connections for your loved one.

5. Mind share. Suggest volunteering, but not at a place where there are sad, distressed people. Hospitals, for example, might not be the place to lift a persons’ spirit.

But zoos, conservatories, and kid-centered activities all can be uplifting. And if your relatives have special talents to share, help them find places where they can teach their skills to others.  Search for volunteer opportunities at www.seniorcorps.gov/Default.asp.

6. Tutoring. Your relatives’ knowledge could be helpful for tutoring programs for kids needing math and reading help or to participants in adult literacy programs. Plus, the one-on-one relationship that develops can be satisfying and beneficial for both parties.

Find opportunities by getting in touch with local schools and religious institutions or search for U.S. opportunities at www.volunteermatch.org. In Canada, visit www.volunteer.ca and www.getinvolved.ca. Or search your province for regional and city-specific organizations, such as British Columbia’s www.volunteerbc.bc.ca and Ottawa’s  www.volunteerottawa.ca. Also, such sites help you locate volunteer activities beyond tutoring.

7. Political activism. This is an election year in the United States, so campaigns are on the hunt for volunteers. If your relatives are politically active, there’s likely a campaign that can tap their skills over the coming months.

8. Inclusive celebrations. Invite elderly neighbors to dinner parties, backyard BBQs and neighborhood social events. If transportation or walking is a problem, they may decline. So when you extend the invitation, offer to pick them up and take them home.

A place to vent

Who hasn’t had a bad experience dealing with a credit card problem? Typically you’re left to resolve problems on your own with your financial institution.

And you think your issue is an isolated incident.

But now there’s a place to find out that you’re not alone. And to complain.

Just this month, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) (www.consumerfinance.gov) gave the public access to a beta version of a database that tracks credit card complaints.

Visitors can get a sense of the most common consumer gripes, the card issuers that people are complaining about, and they can  also see how effectively  financial institutions resolve problems.

The CFPB also lets consumers log complaints and find resolutions to the credit card problems that plague them. CFPB accepts, screens, and investigates consumer complaints and forwards them to the financial institution. Those institutions have a set period to respond to and resolve the problem.

Submit a complaint  at and search the database, www.consumerfinance.gov/complaintdatabase, to get more insight on common complaints.  Billing disputes and disagreements about APR and interest rates top CFPB’s list of gripes.

One aim of the database is greater transparency, and it also can help you when you’re deciding which institutions to do business with.

Though this database is focused on credit cards, the CFPB is considering developing similar databases for other consumer financial products and services.

Coming home from the hospital

Doctors do a great job of explaining the medical aspects of recovery from surgical procedures.

But they’re not always great about outlining the practical day-to-day challenges that caregivers need to address. To make your patient’s recovery easier in the days after a surgery, be sure to understand and plan for the non-medical aspects of daily care.

Here are some considerations:

1. Gear. Find out what extra things to have on hand to keep the person comfortable. Small pillows may be needed to prop up an arm or an ankle. Towels can be rolled up to support the back. Cloth baby diapers can prevent chafing and neck strain when someone is wearing a sling.

The bathroom can be especially dangerous, so consider adding grab bars or renting stools and shower chairs. Also, ask about the strategies and other devices that will boost your patient’s comfort and safety.

2. Clothing. Zippers and buttons suddenly become difficult to operate when you’ve had certain surgeries. Think about the clothes that will be easiest to get on and off and which garments will afford your loved ones the greatest independence.

An arm injury, for example, can make putting on t-shirts and pullover sweaters impossible. So think oversized shirts with Velcro closures as an alternative.

3. Safe house. Even if your spouse or parent normally is nimble, surgery can temporarily diminish their agility. Be certain that the house is safe for them to navigate, especially if they’ll be taking pain medications that cause grogginess or if they’ll be using a wheelchair or walker.

Move furniture they can bump into, pick up throw rugs that can cause trips, and remove delicate decorative items from tables.

4. Medical-related duties. You could be charged with changing bandages, taking slings on and off, and managing other medical devices.  Be certain that you get some lessons on carrying out your duties before you leave the medical center.

5. Smooth moves. Talk to nurses and physical therapists about the proper placement and bracing of walkers and other assistive devices. Helping patients in and out of bed and up from chairs doesn’t entail brute force. Learn to protect your body when you’re moving and shifting patients and understand how best to provide support.

 

 

John Stehmeyer
Realtor® Broker CEO

 

PRO PLAYERS REALTY USA
Office (850) 942-SOLD (7653)

3501 Martin Hurst Rd, Tallahassee FL 32312
CDPE, GRI, PME, SFR, SRES

If you know someone who needs Real Estate Help please introduce me to them!

 

 

 

Real Estate Matters: News & Issues for the Mature Market

U.S. home re-sales complete best winter in 5 years

U.S. home sales are gradually coming back. A mild winter and a stronger job market have helped boost sales ahead of the crucial spring buying season.

The past two months made up the best winter for sales of previously occupied homes in five years, when the housing crisis began. And the sales pace in January was the highest since May 2010, the last month that buyers could qualify for a federal home-buying tax credit.

February sales dipped only slightly to a seasonally adjusted 4.59 million, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday. That’s 13 percent higher than the sales pace last July and just below the revised 4.63 million in January.

Ian Shepherdson, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics, said the lower February’s numbers “should not detract from the key point, which is that sales are trending upward.”

The sales pace remains far below the 6 million that economists equate with healthy markets. And the number of first-time buyers, who are critical to a housing recovery, continues to lag normal levels, while foreclosures remain high.

Still, Florida Realtors President Summer Greene, a Realtor in Fort Lauderdale, said she’s getting multiple offers for listings. That’s been rare since the housing market went bust in South Florida.

“People don’t want to wait on the sidelines anymore and the change is very noticeable,” Greene said. “There’s definitely been a mood shift.”

The median sales prices of homes rose for the first time in four months in February, to $156,600. And the supply of homes on the market increased more than 4 percent in February to 2.43 million, which could signal that more homeowners became confident in the housing market.

There have been other signs of improvement in the depressed housing market.

Homebuilders have grown more confident in the past six months after seeing more people express interest in buying a home. In February, they requested the most permits to build homes since October 2008.

Mortgage rates are near record lows. And the supply of homes fell in January to its lowest level in seven years.

A lower supply helps push up prices, which lures more sellers onto the market and generally improves the quality of homes for sale. Rising prices also boost sales because buyers want to invest in homes that are appreciating in value.

A key reason for the brighter housing outlook is the job market has strengthened. From December through February, employers added an average of 245,000 jobs a month. The unemployment rate has fallen to 8.3 percent, the lowest in three years.

Still, economists caution that the damage from the housing bust is deep and the industry is years away from fully recovering.

Sales among first-time buyers, who are critical to a housing recovery, fell slightly last month to 32 percent of all purchases. That’s down from 33 percent in January. In healthy markets, first-time buyers make up at least 40 percent.

And homes at risk of foreclosure made up 34 percent of sales, down only slightly from 35 percent in January. In more stable markets, foreclosures make up less than 10 percent of sales.

For the past few years, the market has been saturated for years with foreclosures. That has put downward pressure on prices and driven away buyers. Many can’t qualify for loans or meet higher down-payment requirements. Even those with excellent credit and stable jobs are holding off because they fear that home prices will keep falling.

Sales are measured when buyers close on homes. Some deals have been scuttled before the closing after banks declined mortgage applications, home inspectors found problems, appraisals showed a home was worth less than the bid, or a buyer lost a job.

One-third of Realtors say they’ve had at least one contract scuttled in each of the past five months. That’s up from just 18 percent in September.

Sales were mixed across the country. They rose on a seasonal basis 1 percent in the Midwest and 0.6 percent in the South. They dropped 3.2 percent in the West and 3.3 percent in the Northeast.

Don’t sell yet, repair.

If your thinking about selling that Tallahassee home but know the Tallahassee real estate market is just too low then why not start preparing your house now?

The order of things:

Fix the major stuff first:  leaky roof, termites, insulation problems.

Once that’s taken care of you can ‘spruce up the place’ but realize that you likely not to get back every dollar you spend.  Most recommend against doing major remodels.   However, make sure everything is working order.  Your house has to look good.  The golden three are:  clean, paint, get rid of the carpet.

Now it’s on to landscape.  Believe it or not this is one of the most important things.  First impressions and all…

The great thing about taking advantage of a down market is the ability to spread out your repairs over time and knowing that when the housing market recovers you’ll be ready to take advantage.

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